New Study Results Released on Victoza

New Study Results Released on Victoza

New Study Results Released on Victoza

The maker of the injectable insulin Victoza  (aka/ liraglutide), Danish company Novo Nordisk, presented test results at the 9th Annual International Diabetes Federation Western Pacific Region Congress in Kyoto, Japan, on November 27, 2012, that reflected that Victoza is more likely to enable Type 2 diabetics to achieve lower AIC levels during a 26-week period (testing at 12 weeks, 20 weeks and 26 weeks) than does oral Sitagliptin (Januvia) and injectable Exenatide in people with Type 2 diabetes.  The study results indicated that the AIC desired levels were lower than 7.0 during that testing period for the participants in the study.

Victoza, in conjunction with diet and a recommended exercise program, is an injection used only in persons with Type 2 diabetes (not recommended for use for Type 1 diabetes).  A side benefit of Victoza has been a slowing of the emptying of the stomach, which may decrease appetite and create some weight loss in certain patients.

Sitagliptin, commonly referred to as “Januvia,” is made by Merck & Company, and is an oral diabetic drug.  Long-standing studies have shown that this oral medication for treatment in Type 2 diabetes has fewer side effects than any number of other drugs used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes.  Less weight gain and fewer incidents of hypoglycemia have been found in most studies.


Exenatide, made by Amylin, is an injectable medication for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes.  Exenatide was approved for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes along with Metformin when the patient is not reaching desired results with Metformin alone.

Once again, the test results of the 26-week study reflecting that Victoza achieved a more desirable AIC level was released by the maker of Victoza.  Any variation in the treatment of diabetes, whether Type 1 or Type 2, should be undertaken carefully with the help of your medical doctor.