Body Muscle Mass Helps Fight Insulin Resistance

A recent study, the results of which are soon to be published in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, was recently done at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Body Muscle Mass Helps Fight Insulin ResistanceBody Muscle Mass Helps Fight Insulin Resistance: Body muscle mass helps prevent insulin resistance even in overweight individuals. Insulin resistance, in many cases, leads to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.  There is a possibility of stopping the progression from a diagnosis of insulin resistance to full-blown type 2 diabetes with building additional body muscle mass.  Insulin resistance is a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than the normal range and is a cause for concern in one’s overall health.

A recent study, the results of which are soon to be published in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, was recently done at the University of California, Los Angeles.  The senior author of the study results, Preethi Srikanthan, M.D., stated, “Our findings represent a departure from the usual focus of clinicians, and their patients, on just losing weight to improve metabolic health.”  Srikanthan further added, “Instead, this research suggests a role for maintaining fitness and building muscle.  This is a welcome message for many overweight patients who experience difficulty in achieving weight loss, as any effort to get moving and keep fit should be seen as laudable and contributing to metabolic change.”

In studies in the past, it was discovered that low muscle mass is a risk factor for insulin resistance.  Until this time, however, no study had examined whether increasing the body muscle mass to average and then above average levels, separately from the overall body weight, would lead to improved blood sugar levels.

This study took into account the body muscle mass in relationship to insulin resistance and blood sugar metabolism disorders.  It was a nationally representative group sample of 13,644 people.  Those in the study were all older than 20 years of age, none were expecting a child and they all weighed more than a set figure.  This study reflected that the more muscle mass an individual had in relationship to body size the less likely the individual was to insulin sensitivity and, therefore, a lower risk of pre-diabetes.

Usually, research has indicated that individuals with a waist circumference within certain inches is a good indicator for pre-diabetes – the larger the waist measurement, the more likely an individual is to develop pre-diabetes or even diabetes.  Body mass index has been taken into account as well.

Dr. Srikanthan added, “Our research shows that beyond monitoring changes in waist circumference or BMI, we should also be monitoring muscle mass.”

More research would be needed to determine how much help can be garnered from intervention in a person’s life in regards to their exercise routine, to include lightweight weights and more cardio exercise.

Simply lifting soup cans in a repetitive manner (arm curls or over the head) while standing in the kitchen can benefit anyone.  As well, doing small push-ups from the kitchen counter can strengthen the arms.  Doing ten lunges when dusting can strengthen the leg muscles.  Small changes can be incorporated into an individual’s daily life that would help tone and build muscle mass.  In the process, an individual could be helping to prevent the diagnosis of pre-diabetes or even full-blow diabetes.

Author: Staff Writers

Content published on Diabetic Live is produced by our staff writers and edited/published by Christopher Berry. Christopher is a type 1 diabetic and was diagnosed in 1977 at the age of 3.