Couch Potatoes Run the Risk of Death

Couch Potatoes Run the Risk of Death: Shocking research from Australia indicates that people who spend too much time in front of the TV often find themselves at pronounced risk of death or critical health care issues.

According to WiredPRNews.com, “A recent study suggests that too much time in front the television can be bad for the health of individuals; regardless of whether they are overweight or at a healthy weight. As reported by Reuters, Australian researchers found that hours spent sitting in front of a television daily can increase risks of death from heart complications and other health conditions.”

This sedentary lifestyle can result in obesity, which can it turn develop into diabetes. Study leader David Dunstan, of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, is quoted in the report as remarking, “A lot of the normal activities of daily living that involved standing up and moving the muscles in the body have been converted to sitting… For many people, on a daily basis, they simply shift from one chair to another – from the chair in the car to the chair in the office to the chair in front of the television,” according to WiredPRNews.com.

The average television viewing time in America is 5 hours a day. This exceeds the amount researchers felt was acceptable. In fact the study shows that watching more than 4 hours of television each day can result in an 80% greater chance of death by cardiovascular disease and a 46% greater chance of death through other means.



What Causes Death in Watching TV?

You may be surprised to know that weight isn’t always a contributing factor in those who watch TV and struggle with disease. The real culprit seems to be in the act of sitting still for long periods of time. It appears that even those who spend up to an hour each day in exercise can face similar problems if they spend significant amounts of time in activities in which they remain still.

These activities could be reading a book, checking out the web, in a car commuting from one place to another or at a desk in an office.

Our bodies are designed to be used. When we sit without any movement we can cause our bodies to experience problems they weren’t made to handle.

So, is TV Watching Out?

Not necessarily. You might try a stationary bike while watching TV or fold clothes or perform other household chores that still allow you to watch your favorite show. Some individuals might experience better health by not using the remote to change the television or perhaps to use commercial breaks to walk around the house until the show comes back on.

The real key here is to pay attention to how much time you spend sitting still. In school academic activity is broken up by physical movement. The same should be true in the life of a family. Limit the amount of time a child spends playing video games. Transfer some of the time you might spend in watching TV to an evening walk or time on a treadmill.

If you work in an office take the time to walk a report to a colleague or to find time to locate office supplies you need rather than using the intercom to ask for it to be brought to your office. Find ways to get and stay mobile. Your long-term health is more important than what’s new on television tonight.